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Community Events 2018 - 2019


October | November | December | March

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October


Seed to Table: How to Process and Eat Acorns of the Laguna Watershed
Workshop with Zoe Minervini-Zick and Dylan Gearheart
Friday, October 19, 6:00pm-8:30pm
Location: Heron Hall, Laguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401
Sliding scale $15, $25, or $45. Pre-registration required
(see below).

Have you ever thought about eating acorns? Here's your opportunity to try it in this hands-on workshop. Let us introduce you to the wonders of acorns as a local staple food. We'll cover oak species identification, how to locate, harvest, process acorns into flour and give back to the land. Reciprocity is a key component in building a healthy relationship with the plants we forage. In these times of changing climate, oaks are a resilient candidate for nourishment and have been for local indigenous tribes for generations. Learn to integrate oaks into your everyday life and participate in local food sovereignty efforts. A portion of the proceeds from this workshop will be donated to the California Indian Museum and Cultural Center's Acorn Bites food sovereignty project. Acorns and processing tools will be provided, but participants are welcome to bring their own acorns or mortar and pestles/grain grinders. Vegan and non-vegan acorn mush will be available to taste, in addition to hot drinks and light snacks. This workshop is suitable for adults and teens 13 and older (minors must be accompanied by an adult), and will take place indoors, rain or shine.

Zoe Minervini-Zick grew up with coast live oaks in Oakland (Ohlone land) and Sebastopol (Southern Pomo land), California. She has been studying ethnobotany for nine years, starting at the Northeast School of Botanical Medicine in Ithaca, New York and most recently at the Columbines School of Botanical Studies in Eugene, Oregon. As a forager, gardener, fermenter, and land steward she is working towards personal, cultural and ecological healing and resilience. Dylan Gearheart is an aspiring native plant horticulturalist and tracker who grew up in San Diego (Kumeyaay territory) around coast live oaks and chaparral. He received a B.S. in Industrial Arts and Design from Humboldt State University and certificate in Permaculture Design and Social Forestry from Siskiyou Permaculture. He is continuing to develop his skills in providing ecological garden consultations, design and maintenance.


From Plants to Paper: Papermaking with Laguna Plants
Two-Day workshop with Jane Ingram Allen
Saturday and Sunday, October 20 and 21, 10:00am-4:00pm each day
Location: Heron Hall, Laguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401

$200. Pre-registration required (see below). Suitable for adults and teens 15 years old and up.

This workshop will cover how to make paper from local plant materials found in the Laguna de Santa Rosa. Learn what plants will make paper. During a walk around the native plant landscape at the Laguna Environmental Center, we will identify plants suitable for papermaking and gather dried leaves and bark from trimmed branches or fallen twigs. We will also talk about and experiment with invasive plants that can be used for papermaking. We will cook the plant materials, beat the fibers, and make paper from them. The emphasis will be on creative problem solving and creative use of materials to make unique handmade paper using sustainable methods that do not harm the environment. Pulps that the instructor will bring to supplement the ones gathered in the workshop will also be used in the class, such as kozo and abaca. The instructor will introduce unique techniques that she has developed from her experiences as an artist in residence around the world. Students bring scissors, notebook, and a sheet of cardboard to carry home any wet sheets of homemade paper. All other papermaking supplies will be provided, as well as hot drinks and snacks. Suitable for all experience levels from novice to experienced papermakers. The handmade papers can be used for drawing, painting, printmaking and collage as well as for creating greeting cards (just in time for the holidays!).

Jane Ingram Allen is originally from Alabama and lived in Taiwan from 2004-2012, and in Santa Rosa since 2012. She is an environmental artist who creates sculpture installations and community public art projects using handmade paper made from local plants and other natural materials. She is also an independent curator and arts writer and has taught art courses at colleges and universities as well as papermaking classes all over the world. Jane has received awards to do artist in residency projects in the USA, Taiwan, the Philippines, Japan, Nepal, Brazil, China, Bali, Indonesia, and Turkey. She exhibits her art internationally, teaches workshops, and creates site-specific public art installations. For more information, visit Jane's website and her blog.



Adult FYLF. Image by G. Nafis


FYLF Tadpols. Image by Dave Cook


FYLF egg mass. Image by Dave Cook

Ecology and Conservation of the Foothill Yellow-legged Frog
Workshop with Dave Cook and Jeff Alvarez
Lecture:
Friday, October 26, 2018, 8:00am-1:30pm
Field Trip: 3 Sessions to Choose From. Friday afternoon, Saturday morning, or afternoon.
Location: Lecture will be held at Heron Hall, Laguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401. Fieldtrip at a Sonoma County location. Details sent upon registration.
Cost: $200. Includes lunch & materials. Early bird & student rates available.
Pre-registration required.
*This workshop is full, but you’re welcome to join the waitlist.

This workshop is designed to provide practical knowledge to professional biologists, resource managers, and students on the life history, ecology and conservation of the Foothill Yellow-legged Frog (Rana boylii). This frog is a candidate for listing under the California Endangered Species Act and has been petitioned for listing under the federal Endangered Species Act. The Friday morning lecture will review identification features at frog life stages and similar species, range and distribution, habitat requirements, behavior, survey techniques, conservation needs, and regulations. An accompanying field trip will be held at a nearby creek and known site of FYLF. Aquatic habitat types will be discussed and a demonstration of survey techniques provided.

Attendees may choose from a Friday afternoon (1:30-5:00pm) or Saturday field trip session (8:00am-11:30am or 12:30pm-4:00pm). Personal transportation is required for the field trip. Carpooling is encouraged.

Questions? Email workshops@lagunafoundation.org.

Instructors Dave Cook and Jeff Alvarez are experts on amphibian ecology and conservation, and conduct herpetological research throughout California. This workshop is sponsored by the Laguna Foundation and The Wildlife Project which specializes in environmental compliance and technical field surveys. They assist clients with mitigation development and monitoring, special-status species surveys and habitat evaluations, biological assessments, survey and monitoring technique development, and biological consultation.


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November


Expressive Nature Photography in the Laguna Watershed
Workshop with Brenda Tharp (current Heron Hall exhibitor)
Saturday, November 17, 8:00am-5:00pm, rain or shine
Location: Heron Hall, Laguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401
$125. Pre-registration required
(see below).

Autumn is a great time to capture the seasonal changes of nature! Join us in an educational and inspirational photography workshop conducted by local Brenda Tharp, and learn how to create more expressive photographs of nature. We’ll begin at Heron Hall with a visual presentation of key concepts that can help make a picture stronger, including discussions on learning to see, composing for maximum impact, creating visual depth, choosing the best shutter or aperture, interpreting vs. recording the scene, and how to use special in-camera techniques to create impressionistic effects. We’ll carpool to another site or two within the Laguna watershed to explore and apply what was covered in class (locations will depend on conditions at the time). This small class (max 15 participants) is appropriate for ages 17 and up. Registrants should have a working knowledge of photography basics and of their camera gear.

A locally-based nature, wildlife and travel photographer, Brenda Tharp spends as much time as possible outdoors, photographing the beauty of nature and the world around her. "I’m in awe of what I discover out there,” she says. Passionate about nature and teaching, she has written three photo books, her latest being "Expressive Nature Photography.” Brenda leads workshops and tours throughout the USA, as well as internationally. Her images have been used widely in magazines, books, and brochures. More information can be found at Brenda Tharp. ;Her continually expanding collection of fine art prints is available here. Brenda’s current photography exhibit, With Awe and Wonder: A Celebration of Nature’s Beauty is on display in Heron Hall September 4 through December 21, 2018, with an opening reception on Saturday, September 8. Details here.


Nature Journaling at the Laguna with Marley Peifer
Workshop and field trip with Laguna Foundation and LandPaths
Sunday, November 18, 1:00-5:00pm (back-up rain date November 25)
Beginning Location: Laguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401
FREE. Pre-registration required through LandPaths.

Do you want to experience nature with fresh eyes? Do you want to notice, understand, and remember more of the vibrant world around you? This fun class will teach you the tools used by the greatest naturalists of all time. Using pencils, ink, and watercolors, we will create sketches and take notes of our encounters with the fascinating biodiversity of the Laguna de Santa Rosa. In this class, we will assemble one of the most powerful tool-kits for learning about Nature. Following in the footsteps of Audubon, Humboldt, and Darwin, we will reunite art and science in a creative synthesis that is fun, functional, and aesthetically engaging. By the end of the class, you will have sharper eyes, better nature awareness, and a beautiful journal documenting your experience. You will also possess the tools and mindset necessary to pursue a life-long learning adventure. Beginning and ending at Heron Hall, most of this workshop will take place outdoors at the Laguna Environmental Center and carpooling to a nearby location along the Laguna. Total walking will be 1-2 miles on mostly flat but uneven terrain. Snacks and hot drinks will be provided. A complete list of supplies to bring will be sent upon registration, including sketchbook and watercolor field palette. This workshop is suitable for adults, but open to families with children 10 years and up, if the children are comfortable outdoors and self-motivated and focused around learning in nature. Rain cancels, and our backup rain date is the next Sunday, November 25.

Marley Peifer lives in Sebastopol where he practices gardening, wildlife tracking, and painting. He longs for a reintegration of art with science and words with images, a synthesis that he develops in his journaling. Nature journaling has been a fundamental practice for Marley ever since he discovered how it ignited his other interests and accelerated his learning.

This free program is made possible through a partnership between the Laguna Foundation, LandPaths and the Sonoma County Ag + Open Space District. The District permanently protects the diverse agricultural, natural resource and scenic open space lands of Sonoma County for future generations. It is funded through a quarter-cent sales tax that was voted in by the residents of Sonoma County.


ALBATROSS Film Screening
Thursday, November 29, 7:00-9:00pm
Location: Laguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401
FREE
(donations gratefully accepted). Pre-registration required (see below).

Directed by Chris Jordan, ALBATROSS (97 minutes) is a powerful visual journey into the heart of an astonishingly symbolic environmental tragedy. On one of the remotest islands on our planet, tens of thousands of baby albatrosses lie dead on the ground, their bodies filled with plastic. Returning to the island over several years, the film team witnessed the cycles of life and death of these birds as a multi-layered metaphor for our times. This story is framed in the vividly gorgeous language of state-of-the-art high-definition digital cinematography, surrounded by millions of live birds in one of the world’s most beautiful natural sanctuaries. The viewer will experience stunning juxtapositions of beauty and horror, destruction and renewal, grief and joy, birth and death, coming out the other side with their heart broken open and their worldview shifted. Stepping outside the stylistic templates of traditional environmental or documentary films, ALBATROSS takes viewers on a guided tour into the depths of their own spirits, delivering a profound message of reverence and love that is already reaching an audience of millions of people around the world.

ALBATROSS is an adult film with strong emotional content, so it is recommended for viewers age 12 and above. Doors open at 6:30pm. Light snacks provided.

For a preview, visit the film’s website and watch the trailer, visit their Facebook page and read this Guardian article about the film. The film team says, “A primary intention of ALBATROSS is to delve into feelings of a kind that we might usually tend to avoid. This film looks deeply into sadness, grief, beauty, and love, in ways that can feel uncomfortable. But as director Chris Jordan likes to say, that is the whole intention: when we allow ourselves to feel our sadness for what is being lost in our world, then we connect with the part of ourselves that loves our world. In this way, coming to know the true nature of grief can be a liberating experience. When grief is no longer seen as a “bad” feeling, then it can be embraced as a portal to deeper connection with life.”


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December


Painting Mushrooms in Gouache
Workshop with Lucy Martin
Saturday, December 1, 10:00am-3:00pm (takes place indoors, rain or shine)
Location: Heron Hall, Laguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401
$95. Pre-registration required
(see below).

Join Lucy Martin to learn about her painting technique using gouache, which is similar to watercolor, but more opaque. Gouache technique is quite different from regular watercolor technique. You will learn some of the techniques Lucy uses to produce her very detailed paintings of mushrooms, bark, leaves, lichens, moss and oak galls. Whether permitting leading up to the workshop, this class will focus on mushrooms and their surroundings, which could include dead leaves, bark, moss, twigs, and other things found around mushrooms. If dry weather prevents local mushrooms from fruiting, we will paint related scenes of the forest floor. Lucy will supply mushrooms and other subjects. Participants are welcome to go for a walk in the woods and find things that interest them to paint. Dead leaves, bark, and moss are especially recommended. Enjoy a quiet, peaceful day in Heron Hall to enhance your observation and painting skills. Suitable for adults and teens 14 years, and at least some drawing experience is helpful. A supply list will be sent upon registration. Questions? Email Anita.

Lucy lives in Sonoma County, California. She is mainly self-taught, with some formal training including classes with Mary Jo Koch. She exhibits in the Sebastopol Gallery and Calabi Gallery, as well as annually in Art Trails, the juried Sonoma County Open Studio art tour. Her work was purchased for the Permanent Collection of the Special Collections and Archives Department at the McHenry Library at UCSC. She has exhibited in international shows of the American Society of Botanical Artists and solo shows at the Library at the San Francisco Botanical Garden. Her art exhibit focused on lichens was on display in Heron Hall during the summer of 2018.  Visit Lucy's website.


 

Weave a Willow Basket
Workshop with Charlie Kennard
Sunday, December 2, 9:30am-3:30pm
Location: Heron Hall, Laguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401
$95. Pre-registration required
(see below).

Enjoy a delightful day full of hands-on learning in Heron Hall and around the peaceful Laguna Environmental Center grounds with master weaver, Charlie Kennard. Using freshly-gathered native grey willow, we will make open weave twined baskets for holding fruits or nuts. This workshop requires manual dexterity, and prior experience with twining is helpful. Suitable for adults and teenagers. All basket-making materials are included in the registration fee. Participants bring garden clippers or small wire cutters and a sharp knife, as well as their own lunch. Hot drinks and snacks are provided throughout the day.

Charlie Kennard of San Anselmo is a long-time basket weaver and student of California Indian and other traditional basketry techniques of the world. He teaches throughout the Bay Area, and in many schools and at teacher trainings. Tule boats made in his workshops can be seen at the California Academy of Sciences, the Bay Model in Sausalito, and in the collection of the Lake County Museum. You can also visit a basketry plant garden Charlie has created at the Marin Art and Garden Center in Ross, where he and friends have woven a basket 13-feet across. Charlie is active in native habitat restoration in Marin, managing several projects for Friends of Corte Madera Creek Watershed.


 

Traditional Environmental Knowledge and Climate Change
Presentation with Pomo Tribal Elder, Nick Tipon
Thursday, December 6, 7:00-8:30pm
Location: Laguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401
$12
(non-refundable).  Pre-registration required (see below).

The Southern Pomo and Coast Miwok people have lived in the Laguna de Santa Rosa area for thousands of years; learning how and what to gather from this land and developing a deep relationship with it. Today, society is studying the effects of climate change to our environment, our way of life, and methods we might use to mitigate and adapt to these changes. The “Traditional Environmental Knowledge” (TEK) of native people offers a template to guide the mitigation process and provide techniques for adaption. California State Climate Adaption Forum held recently in Sacramento provided a blueprint for engaging Tribes and their traditional knowledge to understand changes and to provide methods to mitigate the environmental changes to the Laguna and beyond. Tribal Elder Nick Tipon will talk about the connection between the science of climate change and the use of TEK, share some of these recent efforts, and lead a discussion. Hot drinks and light snacks will be provided.

Nick Tipon was born, raised, and lives in Santa Rosa. He is a retired high school teacher and is a current Board member of the Historical Society of Santa Rosa, Fibershed, and is a member of the Point Blue Conservation Science STRAW faculty. Nick is an enrolled member and elder of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria (Coast Miwok and Southern Pomo). He has served as Chairman of the Tribal Education Committee and the Tribe’s Sacred Sites Protection Committee. He also served as the Tribe’s National Parks and Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) Liaison and is a former Tribal archaeological site monitor. Nick lectures on a variety of topics related to changes to Native American cultural resources, archaeology, curation of artifacts, and the treatment of Native American cultural resources. He consulted and lectured at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington DC and the Field Museum of Chicago. Nick and others from the Tribe have also been instructors for our Learning Laguna docent trainings.


The Most Unknown: Film Screening
A documentary film by Ian Cheney
Thursday, December 13, 7:00-9:00pm
Location: Heron Hall, Laguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401
Sliding scale $5, $12, or $20
(non-refundable). Pre-registration required (see below).

The Most Unknown is an innovative documentary film that’s primed to reinvigorate love for scientific inquiry by exploring some of the universe’s toughest questions. It is an epic documentary film that sends nine scientists to extraordinary parts of the world to uncover unexpected answers to some of humanity’s biggest questions. How did life begin? What is time? What is consciousness? How much do we really know? By introducing researchers from diverse backgrounds for the first time, then dropping them into new, immersive field work they previously hadn’t tackled, the film pushes the boundaries of how science storytelling is approached. What emerges is a deeply human trip to the foundations of discovery and a powerful reminder that the unanswered questions are the most crucial ones to pose. Join us for this evening of film in Heron Hall.  Hot drinks and snacks provided. Click here to watch a 2-minute trailer of the film.

Directed by Emmy-nominated and Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Ian Cheney (The Search for General Ts , The City Dark ) and advised by world-renowned filmmakerWerner Herzog (Fitzcarraldo, Aguirre, The Wrath of God, Grizzly Man), The Most Unknown is an ambitious look at a side of science never before shown on screen. The film was made possible by a grant from Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science.


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March 2019


 

Tule Berry-Gathering Basket
Workshop with Charlie Kennard
Sunday, March 17, 2019, 9:30am-3:30pm
Location: Heron Hall, Laguna Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95401
$95. Pre-registration required (see below).

Enjoy a delightful day full of hands-on learning in Heron Hall and around the peaceful Laguna Environmental Center grounds with master weaver, Charlie Kennard. Using tule, (a giant species of sedge native to the Laguna and freshwater marshes all over North America), we will weave an Owens Valley Paiute-style scoop-shaped basket. This basket was used for gathering berries and for storing honey-dew collected from the leaves of common reed. Several unusual weaving techniques will be practiced during this workshop. Previous experience with twining is recommended. Suitable for adults and teenagers. All basket-making materials are included in the registration fee. Participants bring their own lunch. Hot drinks and snacks are provided throughout the day.

Charlie Kennard of San Anselmo is a long-time basket weaver and student of California Indian and other traditional basketry techniques of the world. He teaches throughout the Bay Area, and in many schools and at teacher trainings. Tule boats made in his workshops can be seen at the California Academy of Sciences, the Bay Model in Sausalito, and in the collection of the Lake County Museum. You can also visit a basketry plant garden Charlie has created at the Marin Art and Garden Center in Ross, where he and friends have woven a basket 13 feet across. Charlie is active in native habitat restoration in Marin, managing several projects for Friends of Corte Madera Creek Watershed.


 

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Also on tap, coming up ... Stay tuned for details!

  • December 8 - Crane Creek hikeJanuary 13 - Colgan Creek walk
  • January 19 - Opening Reception for Faith Rumm's Heron Hall Art Exhibit, mixed media tapestries
  • January 26 - Winter Colors, colored pencils drawing workshop with Nina Antze
  • February 2 - Laguna Kayaking: Celebrating World Wetlands Day
  • February 3 - Pressed Flowers Workshop with Jan Lochner
  • March 9 - Watercolor Painting for Beginners, workshop with Donna DeLaBriandais
  • Winter Kayaking Trips on the Laguna
  • Spring Vernal Pool field trips
  • Monarchs and Pollinators presentation
  • Behind the Scenes Restoration walks with Laguna Foundation staff
  • Wildlife Watching Evenings at the Laguna Environmental Center
  • Talks about climate adaptation, botany, anthropology, reptiles, arachnids, bats, and insects
  • And much, much more!!!

Cancellation Policy

If you are registered for an event and need to cancel, please notify us as soon as possible so that others may attend. Cancellations received more than 30 days in advance of the event date will receive a refund minus a $10.00 processing fee. Cancellations made between 30-7 days in advance will receive a 50% refund. We are sorry but refunds cannot be given on cancellations made less than 7 days in advance. Please also note that we often need a minimum number of participants to conduct most events. If the Laguna Foundation needs to cancel the event for any reason, we will notify you as soon as possible (at least 1 day prior to the event) and you will receive a full refund.

Non-Refundable Fee

Events that cost $20 and less are non-refundable (except in case of our cancelling for inclement weather or other extenuating circumstances, in which case we will issue full refunds). This is due to administrative costs and significant processing fees associated with online registration services such as Eventbrite. Thank you for your understanding and for your interest and support of our programs!


For more information, contact Anita Smith, Public Education Manager
(707) 527-9277 xt. 110 or by email at anita@lagunafoundation.org.

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